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Data Breach Forces Shutdown at UK Skin and Bone Manufacturer

Duncan MacRae

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human skeleton

The breach is not thought to have impacted any of Tissue Regenix’s UK operations or any of its financial systems.

A British medical products developer that creates skin, bone and organ grafts has shut its manufacturing plant in the US after it suffered a cybersecurity breach.

Regenerative medtech firm Tissue Regenix Group confirmed that its computer systems and a third-party IT service provider in the US had been accessed without permission, although it has not revealed how the incident occurred or exactly when the breach was discovered.

Tissue Regenix subsequently took the affected system offline and closed down operations at its Texas plant. The firm has appointed forensic cybersecurity specialists to investigate how the breach happened, and has said it is in talks with the relevant legal authorities.

The breach is not thought to have impacted any of Tissue Regenix’s UK operations or any of its financial systems.

A spokesperson for the company said: “Tissue Regenix has taken precautionary steps, including taking affected systems offline. This has restricted access to certain business operations, including the company’s ability in the short-term to continue manufacturing in its United States facility, which has been taken offline whilst the incident is being investigated.

“The company is engaged with its third-party IT service provider, the relevant legal authorities and cyber security experts to rectify the incident as quickly as possible and to minimise any impact on its operations. The time required to resolve the incident is currently unknown.”

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The revelation of the breach led to Tissue Regenix’s share price falling by 22%.

Tissue Regenix, based in York, England, was founded in 2006 as an offshoot of the University of Leeds, and set up a US base towards the end of 2012.

The company specialises in developing tissue that can be used to repair diseased or worn-out human body parts, and is unlikely to be rejected by the patients’ bodies.

Duncan MacRae

Editor

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